Blog

Happy Valentine’s Day! Every year, just as the legislative grind is really hitting, Montpelier pulls off a small miracle and covers itself in hearts. Thank you to the forces behind this effort—it never fails to make me smile.
Last week, Vermont officially implemented the Nurse Licensure Compact. This licensure compact came after years of advocacy from VAHHS and other health care provider associations, as well as extensive work from the Office of Professional Regulation. It is all too easy to jump to the next emerging policy issue without taking a beat to properly acknowledge this type of accomplishment. I want to thank all those in the legislature and at the Office of Professional Regulation who made this happen!
When I think of sustainability, the first thing that comes to mind is partnership. Whether it is a marriage or a mission, a policy or a plan, making it sustainable requires collaboration. Rarely does major progress occur because someone acted alone.
I get it. No one wants to talk about COVID anymore. Let’s put this thing in the rearview mirror and move on with our lives, but a lot of the health care workers I’m talking to are more demoralized than ever as we continue to deal with capacity issues and various shortages from COVID therapeutics to blood. If you encounter someone in the health care field, please give them a kind word.
Like most other states, Vermont is experiencing a severe and growing blood shortage. Please visit redcrossblood.org to find blood drives in your area and donate if you can!
Most of my recent columns have been about COVID, which makes sense given it has been such a dominant feature of our lives for two plus years now. Today, I write about another deeply concerning, but really important, issue: the Green Mountain Care Board and its role in our health care system.
A State House Divided… Late last week, the House overwhelmingly voted to return in person tomorrow with exemptions for those who request it. The Senate will continue to work remotely. How will this hybrid legislating work? What will happen to all of the non-legislator denizens? Will this allow more or less transparency and access? Stay tuned!
There are few places in the U.S. today where partisanship isn’t front and center, too often clouding common sense and derailing progress on critical issues. Given the state of affairs in Washington and the stress of our third year managing a pandemic, it was hopeful last week to see some unity and common purpose in our corner of the country.
Although they were firmly in their home offices, the legislators hit the ground running last week and took up our top priorities of health care workforce, extending regulatory flexibilities and telehealth. The amount of activity during what is usually a “getting up to speed” week speaks volumes. Hopefully we will see even more activity when Governor Scott presents his FY 2023 budget, which is tentatively scheduled for January 18th.
As we close the door on 2021 and look to the new year, here’s what I sadly cannot tell you—that COVID will be gone and life will return to how it was in January of 2020. We are never going back. COVID is here to stay in one form or another. The holiday wave of cases set infection records unimaginable in the early days of the pandemic. With Omicron spreading rapidly, our hospitals face the possibility of another surge of patients in the coming weeks.
Happy Valentine’s Day! Every year, just as the legislative grind is really hitting, Montpelier pulls off a small miracle and covers itself in hearts. Thank you to the forces behind this effort—it never fails to make me smile.
Last week, Vermont officially implemented the Nurse Licensure Compact. This licensure compact came after years of advocacy from VAHHS and other health care provider associations, as well as extensive work from the Office of Professional Regulation. It is all too easy to jump to the next emerging policy issue without taking a beat to properly acknowledge this type of accomplishment. I want to thank all those in the legislature and at the Office of Professional Regulation who made this happen!
When I think of sustainability, the first thing that comes to mind is partnership. Whether it is a marriage or a mission, a policy or a plan, making it sustainable requires collaboration. Rarely does major progress occur because someone acted alone.
I get it. No one wants to talk about COVID anymore. Let’s put this thing in the rearview mirror and move on with our lives, but a lot of the health care workers I’m talking to are more demoralized than ever as we continue to deal with capacity issues and various shortages from COVID therapeutics to blood. If you encounter someone in the health care field, please give them a kind word.
Like most other states, Vermont is experiencing a severe and growing blood shortage. Please visit redcrossblood.org to find blood drives in your area and donate if you can!
Most of my recent columns have been about COVID, which makes sense given it has been such a dominant feature of our lives for two plus years now. Today, I write about another deeply concerning, but really important, issue: the Green Mountain Care Board and its role in our health care system.
A State House Divided… Late last week, the House overwhelmingly voted to return in person tomorrow with exemptions for those who request it. The Senate will continue to work remotely. How will this hybrid legislating work? What will happen to all of the non-legislator denizens? Will this allow more or less transparency and access? Stay tuned!
There are few places in the U.S. today where partisanship isn’t front and center, too often clouding common sense and derailing progress on critical issues. Given the state of affairs in Washington and the stress of our third year managing a pandemic, it was hopeful last week to see some unity and common purpose in our corner of the country.
Although they were firmly in their home offices, the legislators hit the ground running last week and took up our top priorities of health care workforce, extending regulatory flexibilities and telehealth. The amount of activity during what is usually a “getting up to speed” week speaks volumes. Hopefully we will see even more activity when Governor Scott presents his FY 2023 budget, which is tentatively scheduled for January 18th.
As we close the door on 2021 and look to the new year, here’s what I sadly cannot tell you—that COVID will be gone and life will return to how it was in January of 2020. We are never going back. COVID is here to stay in one form or another. The holiday wave of cases set infection records unimaginable in the early days of the pandemic. With Omicron spreading rapidly, our hospitals face the possibility of another surge of patients in the coming weeks.